British Columbia

18/06/18
Author: 
Laura Kane
Cedar George-Parker addresses the crowd as protesters opposed to the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline extension defy a court order and block an entrance to the company's property, in Burnaby, B.C., on Saturday April 7, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

VANCOUVER — Cedar George-Parker remembers the moment he decided to devote his life to defending Indigenous people and their traditional territories. It was the one-year anniversary of a shooting at his high school that killed four of his classmates in Marysville, Wash.

"I dropped to my knees and I said, 'I'm going to make a change in the world,' " he recalled.

18/06/18
Author: 
Chief David Jimmie, Squiala First Nation

Local leaders were neither told nor invited to the meeting with the prime minister, writer says

June 14, 2018

Neither the Ts’elxwéyeqw Tribe nor the Sto:lo Nation Chiefs’ Council were invited to attend the meeting with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on June 5, 2018. We were not notified of the meeting and learned about it through the Chilliwack Progress article, rather than anyone from the Indigenous Advisory and Monitoring Committee. We were also not notified of the intent of the meeting nor why the Prime Minister was attending.

18/06/18
Author: 
Mike De Souza
In an undated image, crews work on Kinder Morgan's Trans Mountain pipeline in Western Canada. Photo courtesy of Kinder Morgan Canad

The Coldwater Indian Band alleges that someone tampered with evidence submitted by Kinder Morgan to Canada’s pipeline regulator to avoid a costly route change on the company's Trans Mountain expansion project.

The Texas-based energy company has proposed to install the new oil pipeline near an aquifer that provides drinking water for the First Nation in the central interior region of British Columbia.

18/06/18
Author: 
Caitlyn Vernon
A model at the LNG Canada offices in Kitimat shows the proposed liquified natural gas liquification plant and marine terminal. ROBIN ROWLAND / THE CANADIAN PRESS

June 17, 2018

With the debate over the Trans Mountain Pipeline and tankers project at fever pitch, another project with enormous climate impacts is slipping under the radar. After B.C. announced new climate commitments in May, LNG Canada’s CEO hinted construction will start soon. More recently, the Malaysian multinational Petronas announced a 25-per-cent stake in the LNG Canada project.

LNG Canada’s final investment decision is imminent.

18/06/18
Author: 
Melanie Green

June 15, 2018

VANCOUVER—The Trans Mountain pipeline expansion may run into more obstacles that could cause serious delays, according to analysis by environmental law organizations.

Experts say the timeline for the pipeline’s completion could be pushed back by as much two years, with over 1,000 permits unresolved, no determined basic route and as many as 25 hearings yet to be conducted.

13/06/18
Author: 
Mike De Souza
A group of kayaktivists gather before heading to a construction barge in Vancouver harbour near Kinder Morgan's Westridge Marine Terminal on Oct. 28, 2017. File photo by Zack Embree

Kinder Morgan put fish, porpoises, sea lions and other marine life in danger during recent construction work near an oil terminal in Vancouver, says a leaked federal letter that warns the company could face prosecution for its violations.

The letter from the federal Fisheries and Oceans Department (DFO) notes that the company also went months without filing mandatory monitoring reports to the government and First Nations before federal officials noticed the Texas company was breaking the rules.

12/06/18
Author: 
Justine Hunter

June 6,, 2018 - Ottawa’s decision to nationalize the Trans Mountain pipeline project will make it the owner of a spur line that feeds Alberta oil to Washington State’s refineries – and opens up a new front in Canada’s conflict with foes of increased oil capacity.

An environmental coalition in Washington State is gearing up to battle the new owner of the pipeline project, saying Kinder Morgan’s pipeline plans include additional capacity to ship oil to their jurisdiction.

11/06/18
Author: 
Linda McQuaig
Protesters opposed to the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline expansion shout at Prime Minister Justin Trudeau as he arrives for a discussion with the Indigenous Advisory and Monitoring Committee, on the Cheam First Nation near Chilliwack, B.C., on Tuesday.  (DARRYL DYCK / THE CANADIAN PRESS)

Describing something as being in “the national interest” gives it a sense of gravitas, of over-arching public purpose.

So it always struck me as odd to hear Justin Trudeau say that the building the Kinder Morgan pipeline was “in the national interest.”

How can something be in the national interest when it would significantly contribute to the destruction of the very planet that sustains us? Can something really serve our interest as a nation when it undermines our more basic interest as humans?

11/06/18
Author: 
Thomas Homer-Dixon and Yonatan Strauch
PHOTO ILLUSTRATION: BRYAN GEE

JUNE 1, 2018

Thomas Homer-Dixon is a CIGI chair at the Balsillie School of International Affairs and professor in the faculty of environment at the University of Waterloo.

Yonatan Strauch is a doctoral candidate in the school of environment, resources and sustainability at the University of Waterloo.

11/06/18
Author: 
Hal Bernton
Washington Spur KM

This is a piece of the much larger acquisition of the Trans Mountain Pipeline, announced last month. An option to more than double the capacity of the small Washington spur line would create the potential for exports from the state — and huge pushback.

The Canadian government is purchasing  a vital link in Washington’s oil network — a nearly 70-mile pipeline spur running through Whatcom and Skagit counties that feeds crude oil to four refineries, according to financial-disclosure documents.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - British Columbia