Fisheries

13/02/18
Author: 
Carl Meyer
Scientists have warned that threatened killer whale populations are at risk from new projects such as the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, which would dramatically increase oil tanker traffic on the B.C. coast. File photo by The Canadian Press

Federal government officials spent two days denying the findings of a scientific paper exploring research into the effects of oilsands pollution in the ocean, a week before the Trudeau Liberals gave the green light to the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion to the west coast.

08/02/18
Author: 
Barry Saxifrage
Where the pollution from Alberta's 12 billion barrels of bitumen has ended up. IPCC data. Background image by NASA/Goddard. Chart by Barry Saxifrage

Lost in the heated arguments over Kinder Morgan's proposed Trans Mountain pipeline is this simple fact: more than a quarter of the bitumen flowing through it will end up as pollution spilling into our oceans — one way or the other.

All the bitumen that doesn't spill from pipelines or tankers gets burned, ending up as carbon pollution dumped into our environment. Over one quarter ends up in the oceans, acidifying them for millennia to come.

24/01/18
Author: 
CBC staff The Current
The Iranian oil tanker Sanchi is engulfed in fire in the East China Sea, on Jan. 13, 2018. (China Daily via Reuters)

It's an oil spill the size of Paris. But only now is the world's attention catching up with the vast scale of the disaster in the East China Sea — the largest tanker spill in decades.

The crash itself happened weeks ago when an Iranian tanker called the Sanchi collided with a Chinese freighter on January 6 and burst into flames, later sinking. Thirty-two crew members are presumed dead.

18/01/18
Author: 
Gloria Dickie

January 18, 2018

Shortly before 4 p.m. on November 26, 2017, a U.S. barge carrying 3.5 million litres of diesel to Alaska broke free from its tugboat, the Jake Shearer, off the rocky shore of British Columbia’s Goose Island. Westerly winds were blowing at 45 knots while rain all but sandblasted the side of the barge, now anchored precariously in rough waters. The Canadian Coast Guard vessel deployed from Prince Rupert, approximately 300 kilometres away, wasn’t expected to reach the stranded barge until 7:30 p.m. at the earliest.

17/01/18
Author: 
Damien Gillis

Part one of a series. Provincial lab played key role in denying existence of HSMI in BC.

10 Jan 2018

In 2002, Dr. Ian Keith, a senior DFO veterinarian, began noticing strange heart lesions when he examined Atlantic salmon from B.C.’s growing fish farm industry.

Keith was likely the first to detect signs of Heart and Skeletal Muscle Inflammation. The disease, first found three years earlier in Norwegian farmed salmon, went on to plague the industry there, killing up to 20 per cent of salmon in some outbreaks.

07/01/18
Author: 
Laurie Hamelin

Molina Dawson and Karissa Glendale are vowing to continue their fight against the fish farm industry despite a British Columbia Supreme Court ruling that granted injunctions to two companies against them.

The province’s highest court has granted Marine Harvest Canada and Cermaq Canada injunctions at four different salmon farms north of Vancouver Island.

This means Dawson, Glendale and a number of other First Nation protestors must stay away or face being arrested.

But they say the injunctions won’t stop them.

28/11/17
Author: 
Ian Bailey
A Zidel 277 barge laden with fuel is towed after going adrift on Nov. 26, 2017 near Bella Bella, B.C.  RICHARD REID/HEILTSUK NATION

A day after it went adrift, a fuel-loaded barge was under a tug's control near Bella Bella on Monday, and a B.C. native leader got an unexpected chance to take concerns over such situations directly to the federal Transport Minister.

Marilyn Slett, chief councillor of the Heiltsuk Tribal Council, which raised alarms in October, 2016, when a vessel leaked diesel fuel in waters that are part of their traditional territory, happened to be in Ottawa on Monday for a meeting on reconciliation as the fate of the Zidell Marine 277 played out in the same area.

13/11/17
Author: 
The Canadian Press
An oilsands tailings pond. JEFF MCINTOSH / THE CANADIAN PRESS

EDMONTON — The Canadian government says it lacked the scientific evidence to determine if oilsands tailings ponds were leaking into waterways and hurting fish.

But the government says it continues to work on methods to determine if chemicals associated with bitumen in groundwater are natural, or the result of industry.

The government has provided a response to a call from the environmental arm of NAFTA to explain what Canada is doing to stop oilsands tailings ponds from leaking into Alberta waterways.

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