British Columbia

04/09/14
Author: 
CBC

The battle between the City of Burnaby and Kinder Morgan over the extension of the Trans Mountain pipleline is heating up after municipal officers issued stop work orders to crews surveying the pipeline's proposed route under Burnaby Mountain on Tuesday.

Energy giant Kinder Morgan wants to bore a hole under the mountain in the Vancouver suburb of Burnaby to Burrard Inlet as part of a proposal to nearly triple the capacity of the existing pipeline, but the city has vowed to block the project however it can. 

04/09/14
Author: 
CBC Staff

John Carruthers, president of Enbridge's Northern Gateway unit, said a number of issues need to be sorted out before construction can begin, including winning additional support from aboriginal communities along the 525,000 barrel-per-day line's route through northern British Columbia

"We have stated that the earliest in-service date was 2018," Carruthers said following a speech to a Calgary business audience. "That's quickly evaporating because we need to have this time to meet with people. The focus is on re-engagement, not the in-service date."

25/08/14
Author: 
CP

VANCOUVER - The city of Vancouver says it will go to the Federal Court of Appeal on Friday over Kinder Morgan's proposed expansion of its Trans Mountain pipeline.

The city wants a judicial review of whether the National Energy Board should consider climate change in its assessment of the project.

Vancouver officials have already asked the board, which said it could not take the global issue into account.

24/08/14
Author: 
Dianna French

Many pundits and experts are commenting on Mount Polley Mine’s tailing pond spill from afar, but independent marine biologist Alexandra Morton came to the Cariboo last weekend to have a look for herself.

She didn’t like what she saw.

“I am only a visitor to this disaster, but it has strengthened my resolve to do what I can to stop the stupidity of government that seems only interested in pillaging our home,” Morton said.

Morton has dedicated her life to protecting salmon.

22/08/14
Author: 
Donald Gutstein
Christy Clark and LNG

Boost production in B.C.'s resource industries and we'll all be better off -- especially those of us in the Lower Mainland.

That's the soothing message emanating from the province's newest corporate-sponsored think tank, Resource Works. It's good news for all of us, and especially for the Christy Clark government, which has hitched its horse to the resource-development cart.

But is it true? Will we be better off with increased resource industry production rather than, say, increased tourism or technology development?

17/08/14
Author: 
Sunny Dhillon and Andrea Woo

The B.C. government says an independent investigation into the Mount Polley spill is needed, and the province is indicating there could also be new inspections at other mines.

The tailings pond at the Mount Polley copper and gold mine breached on Aug. 4, sending millions of cubic metres of waste into central B.C. waterways. The spill prompted days of water-use bans for hundreds of people, and the province has said there could be adverse effects on marine life.

17/08/14
Author: 
Alexandra Morton
Today I went to see the Mt Polley mining disaster for myself.  First Nations that I have worked with sampling for European farm salmon viruses called me.  I don't know anything about the mine tailings that exploded out of the Mt Polley tailings pond on August 4th, but I know evasive government behaviour when I see it.  Frankly, I don't believe that this massive injection of mine tailings into pristine Quesnel Lake is not dangerous to life.
16/08/14
Author: 
Jenny Uechi

In an apparent turn of events since the "Fort Nelson Incident", in which 33-year-old Fort Nelson First Nation Chief Sharleen Gale held up a feather and kicked out government officials from an LNG summit, the nation has now signed up a deal for a long-term camp lease for LNG workforce. 

14/08/14
Author: 
Les Leyne

Nine days into what’s going to be years of investigation, the provincial government is in a no-win position when it comes to dam safety. There is widespread suspicion at this point that cutbacks years ago set the tone for less stringent regulation which may have contributed to the catastrophic tailings-pond breach in the Cariboo.

If that proves true, the BC Liberals will pay a stiff price.

13/08/14
Author: 
Peter Moskowitz

The scale of the devastation only became apparent from the air. A dam at a waste pond on the site of a British Columbia open-pit mine had burst, releasing 10m cubic meters of water and 4.5m cubic meters of potentially toxic slurry into virtually untouched forest, lakes and rivers into an area of Canada populated mostly by the indigenous First Nations peoples. Soda Creek First Nations chief Bev Sellars took a helicopter tour to assess the scale of the disaster. “It looked like an avalanche, but avalanches don’t have toxic waste in them,” she said.

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