Climate Change

23/02/24
Author: 
Rachel Sherrington, DeSmog.
photo: Burning piles of hay sent up dark plumes of smoke in Brussels on February 1, as farmers protests sweep through Europe. Rachel Sherrington.

Feb. 7, 2024

Big Agriculture And Far-Right Parties Set Farmers Against The Environment.

But producers on the ground in Brussels told a different story.

Across France, Italy and Belgium last week thousands of farmers descended on capital cities to express their deep discontent with the European food system.

22/02/24
Author: 
Marc Lee
Bus travellers - illustration

Feb. 16, 2024

British Columbians deserve to be able to get to where they need to go quickly, conveniently and affordably, no matter where in the province they live. And meeting our climate goals demands modern, sustainable zero-carbon transit—with great service that can offer a compelling alternative to personal cars.

But after years of neglect and privatization, today’s transit system is plagued with overcrowding, delays and big gaps in service.

21/02/24
Author: 
Max Fawcett
Illustration by Ata Ojani/National Observer

Proposed upgrades to B.C.'s efficiency standards for furnaces, water heaters and other home-heating appliances are coming under fire from some contractors and the province's far right.

20/02/24
Author: 
Chris Hatch
Steam rising from the Nesjavellir Geothermal Power Station in Iceland

Feb. 18, 2024

Mother Nature’s Icelandic lava show has been an impressive reminder that we are surrounded in every direction by awesome amounts of energy. Photons shower down, water cascades, wind blows while waves pulse and tides flow. And the Earth beneath our feet stores heat from the sun’s rays above while generating its own from dark sources below.

20/02/24
Author: 
Natasha Bulowski
Alberta's Environment and Protected Areas Minister Rebecca Schulz at a news conference on Nov. 28, 2023. Photo by Chris Schwarz/Government of Alberta

Feb. 16, 2024

The federal government’s ideas to make major electricity regulations more flexible and responsive to provincial and industry concerns did not win over Alberta.

“This report makes no meaningful corrections to the most destructive piece of Canadian electricity regulation in decades,” said Environment Minister Rebecca Schulz in an emailed statement to Canada’s National Observer.

20/02/24
Author: 
Primary Author: Compiled by Mitchell Beer
Jon Sullivan/flickr  The federal government is getting mixed reviews for proposing major regulatory changes that offer up more flexibility for power producers to burn natural gas and embrace carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology, but contain no specifics on how the revisions would affect greenhouse gas emissions.  The 11-page update [pdf] on Ottawa’s proposed Clean Electricity Regulations (CER), released on a Friday afternoon before a long weekend, was billed as a “what we heard” report from the first

Feb. 20, 2024

The federal government is getting mixed reviews for proposing major regulatory changes that offer up more flexibility for power producers to burn natural gas and embrace carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology, but contain no specifics on how the revisions would affect greenhouse gas emissions.

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