Ecology/Environment

13/01/24
Author: 
Kai Nagata
Okanagan solar

Jan. 9, 2024

Major pipelines over budget, cancelled or facing fierce opposition

Just three days before Christmas, British Columbians received a surprise gift: a pipeline rejection. The BC Utilities Commission denied the application by FortisBC to build a $327 million gas pipeline in the fast-growing south Okanagan.

10/01/24
Author: 
Phil McKenna
CO2 released by burning biogas from cow manure is counted as an emission reduction, rather than a climate pollutant, and multiple state programs are taking credit for the cuts that some see as phantoms. Photo by Chad K/Flickr (CC BY 2.0 Deed)

Jan. 10, 2024

This story was originally published by Inside Climate News and appears here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration.

10/01/24
Author: 
Seth Klein
A delegate is silhouetted while walking past the ExxonMobil booth during the LNG2023 conference, in Vancouver, B.C., Monday, July 10, 2023. Photo by: The Canadian Press/Darryl Dyck

Jan. 10, 2024

One of the biggest climate stories in Canada in 2024 might well prove to be a project that, so far at least, few in the country have heard of — Ksi Lisims LNG.

06/01/24
Author: 
Zoya Teirstein
Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images
Dec. 22, 2024

The temperature-sensitive pathogens that caught U.S. communities off guard are a grim preview of the future.

02/01/24
Author: 
Adam Olsen
 We have an urgent housing crisis and this is evidence of how inefficient it is to wait for the private sector to deliver housing affordability. Photo by Kindel Media/Pexels

Jan. 2, 2024

In recent years, the "progressive YIMBY” (Yes, in my backyard) movement has embraced the idea that a surge in market-housing supply will magically lead to affordability.

However, all housing supply is not created equal. Despite a construction boom building thousands of new market units of multi-family supply, affordable housing remains elusive for over a third of British Columbians. The economic theory is not producing the promised housing affordability.

30/12/23
Author: 
Patrick Egwu and Gabriela Ramirez
Companies hope to use new technology to mine the ocean floor. Critics wonder about environmental costs and who will benefit. Photo via the Metals Co.

Dec. 29, 2023

A Vancouver company is pushing to cash in, but critics fear exploitation and damage.

29/12/23
Author: 
Brendan Montague
São Paulo, São Paulo, Brasil, June 11, 2013. Image: Gabriel Cabral / Creative Commons 2.0.  Gabriel Cabral / Creative Commons 2.0

Website editor: Important read.

Dec. 18, 2023

We need a mass movement to ensure a just transition and prevent climate breakdown. But such contestations can go very wrong.

The people in power are not acting on climate breakdown. Which presents us, those not in power, with three options. We change the actions of those in power, we change the people in power or we change the nature of power itself.

28/12/23
Author: 
Owen Schalk
Photo: Indigenous land defenders from across the Global South were in Toronto last year demonstrating outside the Prospectors & Developers Association of Canada conference | Mining Injustice Solidarity Network on X

Dec. 19, 2023

The ‘green’ transition is spurring a neocolonial rush for minerals

Around the world, Indigenous-led resistance to mining and extraction projects have been intensifying, and it is frequently Canadian companies who are the aggressors, pushing forward with neocolonial land grabs and violent state-sanctioned repression when projects are opposed by locals.

27/12/23
Author: 
Paul Withers
Fisheries and Oceans Canada reduced commercial fish quotas and imposed shutdowns to rebuild depleted stocks in 2022. It shut down the spring herring fishery in the Gulf of St. Lawrence and slashed the herring quota off the Atlantic coast of Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. (Robert F. Bukaty/The Associated Press)

Nov. 22, 2023

Major spending increases and policy changes by the federal government to protect and rebuild wild fish stocks in Canada have resulted in little improvement, according to the 2022 Fishery Audit released this week by environmental group Oceana Canada.

In its sixth annual audit, Oceana says fewer than one third of wild marine fish stocks in Canada are considered healthy and most critically depleted stocks lack plans to rebuild them.

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