Industry Spin

07/12/15
Author: 
Claudia Cattaneo

A hard cap on oilsands emissions that became part of Alberta Premier Rachel Notley’s climate change plan was the product of secret negotiations between four top oilsands companies and four environmental organizations, the Financial Post has learned.

The companies agreed to the cap in exchange for the environmental groups backing down on opposition to oil export pipelines, but the deal left other players on the sidelines, and that has created a deep division in Canada’s oil and gas sector.

28/11/15
Author: 
Eric Reguly

[Webpage editor's note: One business writer who doesn't let the hype obscure the facts.]

ROME -- Beware environmental announcements that the oil industry likes, and the Alberta oil industry certainly liked Alberta Premier Rachel Notley's response to her province's delinquent status on the climate file.

10/11/15
Author: 
Diane Francis
Monica Almeida/The New York Times- There is a proposal to build a railway from Alberta to Alaska, supported by native groups along way, that could carry 1.5 million barrels a day from the oil sands to the super tanker port in Valdez Alaska.

(Editor`s note:  This article from the Financial Post shows how the oil industry keeps on trying to get their product to "tide water"!)

 nation-building project, endorsed by the Assembly of First Nations, should be the top infrastructure, trade and First Nations priority for the new Trudeau government.

It is the proposal to build a railway from Alberta to Alaska, supported by native groups along way, that could carry 1.5 million barrels a day from the oil sands to the super tanker port in Valdez Alaska.

10/11/15
Author: 
Diane Francis
Monica Almeida/The New York Times- There is a proposal to build a railway from Alberta to Alaska, supported by native groups along way, that could carry 1.5 million barrels a day from the oil sands to the super tanker port in Valdez Alaska.

(Editor`s note:  This article from the Financial Post shows how the oil industry keeps on trying to get their product to "tide water"!)

 nation-building project, endorsed by the Assembly of First Nations, should be the top infrastructure, trade and First Nations priority for the new Trudeau government.

It is the proposal to build a railway from Alberta to Alaska, supported by native groups along way, that could carry 1.5 million barrels a day from the oil sands to the super tanker port in Valdez Alaska.

06/11/15
Author: 
Bertrand Marotte

The Quebec government says it will be even tougher for TransCanada Corp. to get the province’s approval for its Energy East oil pipeline now that the company has scrapped plans for a marine export terminal on the St. Lawrence River.

06/11/15
Author: 
Jenny Uechi

A TransCanada whistleblower is alarmed by the National Energy Board's (NEB) recent investigation of the energy infrastructure company, saying it downplays concerns about pipeline safety and regulation compliance.

The 55-page NEB report concludes that 10 of the 16 allegations filed against TransCanada could not be verified, and that public safety and environment was never at risk.

21/10/15
Author: 
Canadian Press

A federal regulator will allow Shell Canada Ltd. to begin exploration drilling off Nova Scotia after it reduced the number of days it would take the company to bring in capping technology in the event of a subsea well blowout.

The company says it would have a capping stack on site within 12 to 13 days after previously saying it would take up to 21 days.

The Canada-Nova Scotia Offshore Petroleum Board said Tuesday it is satisfied that Shell is taking all reasonable precautions to protect safety and the environment.

18/10/15
Author: 
Sara Jerving, Katie Jennings, Masako Melissa Hirsch and Susanne Rust

Back in 1990, as the debate over climate change was heating up, a dissident shareholder petitioned the board of Exxon, one of the world’s largest oil companies, imploring it to develop a plan to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from its production plants and facilities.

The board’s response: Exxon had studied the science of global warming and concluded it was too murky to warrant action. The company’s “examination of the issue supports the conclusions that the facts today and the projection of future effects are very unclear.”

15/10/15
Author: 
Nelson Bennett
Rendering of the proposed Woodfibre LNG project | Submitted

The Squamish First Nation has given the green light to the $1.7 billion Woodfibre LNG project in the form of a Squamish environmental certificate.

Squamish council has issued an environmental certificate to Woodfibre LNG, but has yet to give one to FortisBC, which would build the pipeline infrastructure needed to supply the plant with gas.  

However, both FortisBC and Woodfibre have agreed to all 25 conditions that the Squamish have set out for approving the project.

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